Ahi Wi-Hongi looking down at the camera
Ahi Wi-Hongi

Ahi Wi-Hongi (they / them) is Ngāpuhi and Ngāti Maniapoto, born in the Waikato, raised in the Southern Alps, and currently based in Wellington. They are the National Coordinator of Gender Minorities Aotearoa; the national transgender led public health organisation. Their qualifications are in population health, with a focus on the social determinants of health. Ahi has provided consultations, workshops, seminars, and policy advice to healthcare providers, government agencies, and NGOs since 2013. Ahi is passionate about ensuring equity in human rights, and ending violence, stigma, and discrimination.

Phylesha Brown-Acton looking into the distance
Phylesha Brown-Acton

Phylesha Brown-Acton (she / her) hails from the village of Fineone Hakupua Atua – Niue Island. She is the Executive director of a charitable entity called F’INE Pasifika Aotearoa Trust that provides Whānau Ora support for MVPFAFF+ & Pasifika LGBTQI+ people and their families in Tāmaki Makaurau – Auckland. Phylesha is Co-Investigator for the Manalagi Project, Aotearoa’s first Pasifika Rainbow wellbeing survey, she has extensive Governance experience and is the Co-Chairperson of the Asia Pacific Transgender Network (APTN). Phylesha is an avid weaver (lalaga Niue) and enjoys the communication and knowledge transfer aspects that weaving practices centre

Dr Elizabeth Kerekere under a tree at Parliament looking at the camera
Dr Elizabeth Kerekere
Dr George Parker smiling directly at the camera
Dr George Parker

Dr Elizabeth Kerekere (she / her) was born in Gisborne and is Whānau a Kai, Ngāti Oneone, Te Aitanga a Māhaki, Rongowhakaata and Ngāi Tāmanuhiri, and hails from Ireland on her mother’s side. She has been a Green Party MP since November 2000, with many portfolio responsibilities including for Rainbow Issues. Elizabeth has been a community leader within Rainbow and youth development sectors for over 30 years. She founded Tīwhanawhana Trust in 2001 to advocate for takatāpui to “tell our stories, build our communities and leave a legacy”. Her PhD is on takatāpui identity and well-being, and her takatāpui suicide prevention resources are used in health and school settings across the country. She brings Te Tiriti o Waitangi/takatāpui-based advice to Counting Ourselves and many other health research projects.

George Parker (they / them) is a non-binary person and lecturer in health service delivery at the school of health at Te Herenga Waka|Victoria University of Wellington. George is lead investigator on a Health Research Council NZ funded study on trans, non-binary, takatāpui and intersex inclusive pregnancy and birth care. They are passionate about securing sexual and reproductive justice and high quality sexual and reproductive health care for trans and non-binary people.

 

Dr John Fenaughty smiling at the camera with art work on the wall behind him
Dr John Fenaughty

John Fenaughty (he / him) is at the School of Counselling, Human Services and Social Work at Waipapa Taumata Rau / University of Auckland. His research focuses on equity, particularly in relation to schooling, education and victimisation. John is a Pākehā cis queer man of mainly Irish descent who hails from Mākara in Te Whanganui-a-Tara / Wellington.

Dr Rona Carroll smiling at the camera
Dr Rona Carroll

Dr Rona Carroll (she / her) is a senior lecturer at the University of Otago Wellington and a General Practitioner with a special interest in transgender healthcare. Her research interests are in gender affirming healthcare in primary care, sexual health and medical education.